Some women encounter episodes of domestic violence at one point. However, during the height of the World Cup they are more at risk.

Statistics Show Domestic Violence Crimes Increasing Dramatically During World Cup Season

Amidst the World Cup frenzy, law enforcement agencies also keep an eye out for potential crimes that might arise during the event. They watch out not only for those that happen outside but also inside people’s homes. Statistics from London’s police force shows that during World Cup season, cases of domestic violence spikes drastically. In 2002, 2006, and 2010, incidents increased by 38 percent during times when England lost their matches. Not only do the crimes happen on the day of the games but also after. The situation heightened the cops’ vigilance and to make sure they look out for reports of domestic violence. Deputy Chief Constable, Mark Roberts, the head of the force for the soccer lead from the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), noted that since the World Cup began they have tallied 300 complaints of abuse. Some of the reports received by the police regarding domestic violence showed that there was a sign of alcohol intake, England cops said. The same fact was also presented in a study by Damien J. Williams and Fergus G. Neville from the University of St. Andrews. They concluded that alcohol, along with sports and masculinity, forms the “toxic combination” of violence. However, women activists contend that alcohol is only an aggravating factor to domestic violence. Sandra Horley CBE, the chief executive of help organization Refuge, argued that domestic violence has a pattern. She added that putting the fault solely on football and alcohol clears the suspect of his actions. In connection with this, Women’s Aid also said that sexist and misogynistic views cause the point of view regarding the link between football and domestic violence. Chief Executive, Katie Ghose shared that the behavior of abusers causes the crime. Because of the ongoing situation, Women’s Aid set up a campaign to put an end to cases of domestic violence. The organization’s program, “Football Against Domestic Violence,” started collaborating with football clubs and organizers since 2014. Ghose mentioned that football is part of society’s culture that binds everyone. She emphasized that cooperating with football clubs regarding their campaign could send out a powerful message to end the cycle of violence and sexism.

Leave a reply