Experts warned public regarding essential oil claims

Benefits Of Essential Oils Lack Scientific Proof, Manufacturers Advised To Take Caution On Presenting Claims

Despite the long history of essential oils, the product still lacks studies regarding its health claims. To reduce expectations among consumers, some manufacturers decided to take caution regarding presenting these claims on their product description and labeling.   Historians recorded the use of essential oils in the world as early as 4500 BC. The fragrances were used differently in various cultures. However, the most common purpose was for medicine.   Nowadays, essential oils have many purposes, but people mainly use them for aromatherapy. Makers of extracts place health benefits, which depends on the type of essence, on the product packaging and information. The marketing strategy caused buyers, especially those looking for natural ways to alleviate specific conditions, to purchase essential oils.   Because of the lack of scientific proof regarding the benefits of essential oils, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned the public regarding these. Lindsay Meyer, the office’s spokesperson, shared that those who would want to buy essential oils should be mindful. The lack of research regarding the product could cause health fraud scams that might cause serious injuries.   The FDA previously issued sanctions to three manufacturers of extracts. The department revealed that they received reports regarding the companies’ claims that their products contained ingredients that could cure Ebola, cancer, and brain defects.   In response to their move, the FDA mentioned that they do not consider essences as medicines. It also shared that the products do not meet safety standards. However, they encourage manufacturers to put a disclaimer on their labeling which emphasizes that the products are not intended for curing or preventing diseases.   To aid manufacturers, if ever they still want to show their product claims and to avoid product fraud, must advise other makers only to mention temporary emotions when trying to suggest what the essential oils could soothe.   It is highly recommended referring to body parts in general instead of specifying which area the product claims it could treat. In connection with this, manufacturers should not show disease claims through symbols and pictures.

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